Photography by Jade Starmore

Highland Cattle

Winter is a time of intense activity with the cattle. I feed them at dawn and dusk, and when the weather is severe I take them into the byre for shelter. The byre then gets a deep clean so that we are ready for calving. As the due dates approach, the cattle come into to the byre at night so I can check on them every few hours. This means getting up at 3am. On cloudless nights the stars are out in full force and it makes the sleep deprivation worthwhile. Summer is an easier time, with plenty of grass on the croft.

In 2021 Ishbel and Caraid had two heifer calves, Emma and Oona, who are doing well on the croft alongside the rest of the fold.

Photography by Jade Starmore
Photography by Jade Starmore
Photography by Jade Starmore
Photography by Jade Starmore
Changing Seasons on the croft and garden

Above is Coirstaidh, who loves to be part of the fold, she is very friendly and likes a lot of attention. Below left is Magaidh, who is shy at first, but extremely affectionate once you get to know her. Below right is Julie, who is adventurous and loves to know exactly what's going on. These three are now in a large fold with other young animals over at Aikenshill on the East coast of Scotland. They coped very well with their first ferry journey and are happy in their new home.

Changing Seasons on the croft and garden
Changing Seasons on the croft and garden
Highland cows

Above is head cow Ishbel. Ishbel is bossy and confident but also very sensible. Below is Cara, who is more sensitive and wary, but also loves affection and combing.

Highland cows
Photography by Jade Starmore

Lily (above) is much more reserved and self-contained, whereas Gille (below) demands attention at all times.

Photography by Jade Starmore
Cow hair lined nest

The cattle have two coats – a soft short undercoat that they keep all year, and a long hairy top coat that keeps them warm and dry in winter, but is shed in summer. The iconic image of a highland cow tends to feature this long topcoat, so it may come as a surprise when you see highland cattle that are kept in warmer climates, as they will not have their distinctive topcoat. The hair from their topcoats does not go to waste: the birds pick up the strands and weave them into nests. This nest was nestling in the branches of one of my rose shrubs.

Highland cows
Highland cows
Changing Seasons on the croft and garden
Highland cows