Rheingold Sweater


Petite – Underarm 97cm. Length 62.5cm.
Small – Underarm 104cm. Length 64cm.
Medium – Underarm 114cm. Length 66.5cm.
Large – Underarm 120cm. Length 68.5cm.

This kit includes a colour-printed pattern card with full instructions in all sizes and all the yarn required to make Rheingold in your chosen size. Available in Hebridean 2ply in both Gold (shown in sweater) and Green (shown in swatch) colourways. This design is also available as a wrap.


One day beside the Rhine, three gorgeous water nymphs were teasing Alberich – a Dwarf King from the underworld – when he caught sight of their Rheingold beneath the flowing river. The Rhinemaidens told the dwarf that the gold could give him power to rule the world, but to get it he would have to renounce love forever. He had been pursuing them with such ardour that they never thought he would accept their offer, but he did and made off with the Rheingold before they could do anything about it. Thus begins Wagner’s Ring Cycle, and a whole saga of conflict and destruction. Only when the gold is returned to the Rhinemaidens is the natural balance restored, and a ray of hope falls upon the world.

As I watched a televised production of Das Rheingold I had an idea that will bring a golden glow to any occasion. I created a vertically banded tunic with a wide neck, as this is a very adaptable shape. For the main pattern I sketched a sun with beaming rays looking over a graceful flower with curving leaves and stem. For the narrow contrast panel I invented some delicate motifs to complement the principal flower. For the background I chose the glowing sunshine colours of Whin, Golden Plover and Sundew, with the pattern delicately portrayed in Sea Ivory, Machair, Pebble Beach, Spindrift and Solan Goose. The background and pattern colours are reversed in the narrow contrast bands to create a lengthening and slimming effect. Just the thing to put the light back into the life of a disconsolate Rhinemaiden.

The idea for the colourway shown in the wrap (see details) came while I was standing by Dunkeld Cathedral, taking a break while on the all-too-familiar journey south from the Highlands to Glasgow. The cathedral has been partially restored but just the shell of the original nave survives: a magnificent reminder of former glories. These gothic walls are suitably dark and there are dark, old yew trees along one side. But the sky shows through the pointed, glassless windows and light shimmers and dances up from the River Tay. There is such an interplay of light and dark that it is impossible not to be inspired with ideas for colour schemes. Standing there by the river, I thought you can just as easily have Taymaidens as Rheinmaidens, so I used one of the new colour ideas in my Rheingold design.